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2000-2002 CNV Cohort - Previous Revision

 

Education:

Ph.D. Educational Studies/Literacy and Educational Technology         December 2006
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor       

M.A. Educational Technology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor        December 2000

B.A. Chicano/a Studies, University of California, Los Angeles       June 1993

Grants and Contracts:

Carrillo, R. (2010).  Minority LGBT Communities in Arizona.  Arts, Humanities, and Social
Sciences (AHSS) Faculty Grants award for $22,982.24.

Carrillo, R., Kennedy, E.L., Rubenstein-Avila, E., & Wray, A. (2010). Oral history in Arizona
IV: Technology, gender, race, class, sexuality, and community. Awarded by the Institute for LGBT Studies at the University of Arizona for $700. 

Carrillo, R. (2009).  Collective Moves Toward Sound Oral History Methodology. Awarded by
the Institute for LGBT Studies at the University of Arizona for $1,500. 

Carrillo, R. (2008, Fall).  Graduate Student Research Assistant Grant. Awarded by SBSRI for
~$20,000 to cover Erin Mackinney’s out-of-state tuition, salary, and ERE rate.

Carrillo, R. (2008, April).  Latina Literacy and Collective Theorizing. Proposal awarded by the
University of Arizona Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Institute Faculty Summer Research Grant competition for $5,000.

Carrillo, R., & Alvarez, M. (2008).  Fostering oral history projects that study gender, race, class,
and sexuality in Southern Arizona II.  Proposal awarded by the Institute for LGBT Studies at the University of Arizona for $1,500. 

Publications:

Chapters in Scholarly Books and Monographs:

With original research from candidate-

Carrillo, R. (2010). Mrs. Villa’s mujerista (womanist) pedagogy: The embracing spirit of avivar
along with the contradictions of everyday living.  Accepted for inclusion in the anthology Midwest Mexican/Chicano Writers edited by María A. Beltrán-Vocal, Paul Martínez Pompa, and Irasema Salinas.

Carrillo, R. (2006). Humor casero mujerista (womanist humor of the home): Laughing all the
way to greater cultural understandings and social relations. In D.D. Bernal, C.A. Elenes, F.E. Godinez and S. Villenas (Eds.), Chicana/Latina education in everyday life: Feminista perspectives on pedagogy and epistemology.  NY: SUNY Press.

Carrillo, R. (2004). Making connections: Building family literacy through technology.
In M. Franquiz and C. Salinas (Eds.), Scholars in the field: The challenges of migrant education. Charleston, WV: ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools.

Refereed Journal Articles, Published or Accepted in Final Form:

Carrillo, R., Moreno, M., Zintsmaster, J. (2010). Cultural Production of a Decolonial Imaginary
for a Young Chicana: Lessons from Mexican Immigrant Working-Class Woman’s Culture. Educational Studies, 46(5), 478-502.  Special issue on Youth, New Media and Education, guest edited by Kristen Luschen, Lesley Bogad and Sandra Spickard Prettyman.

Carrillo, R. (2009). Lucero de la Mañana—Expressing Latina Sexuality with Vieja Argüentera
Embodiments and Rasquache Language: How Women’s Culture Enables Living Filosofía.  National Women’s Studies Association Journal, 21(3), 121-142.  Special issue on Latina sexualities guest edited by Lourdes Torres and Lorena García. 

Moje, E.B., Ciechanowski, K.M., Kramer, K., Ellis, L., Carrillo, R., & Collazo, T. (2004).
Working toward third space in content area literacy: An examination of everyday funds of knowledge and Discourse. Reading Research Quarterly, 39(1), 38-70.

Moje, E.B., Collazo, T., Carrillo, R., & Marx, R.W. (2001, April).  “Maestro, what is 'quality'?”
--Language, literacy, and discourse in project-based science. Journal of Research in
Science Teaching, 38(4), 469-498.

Book/Film Reviews:

Carrillo, R. (2009). The Chicana/o Cultural Studies Forum:  Critical and Ethnographic
Practices.  Angie Chabram-Dernersesian (ed.).  New York, NY, and London, UK:  New York University Press, 2007. In Transforming Anthropology, 17(2), 160-162.

Carrillo, R., & Mackinney, E. (2009). El Alambrista: The Fence Jumper. Independent film by
Alfonso Sahagun Casaus. Tucson, AZ: Tormenta de Sonora Productions, 2005.

 

 

 

A first generation college student, daughter of Walter and Robbie Power, and a devoted mommy, I received my doctorate from Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College. While at Vanderbilt, I became a CNV fellow and that mentoring experience has been and will continue to be invaluable to me. It taught me so much about how to negotiate academe, and I often reflect on the sound council that I received in my current position as associate professor at Indiana University Bloomington in the Department of Literacy, Culture, and Language Education. My scholarship has been greatly informed by my experiences as a Black female attending public schools in the South and as a high school English teacher. My research on Black education challenges some of the more traditional paradigms by focusing on the possibilities and strengths of Black students. Over the years, I have been attempting to translate my work into various formats and activities to help inform how we can better meet the educational needs of Black youth. To that end, I have published work in various journals such as Theory into Practice, The Journal of Classroom Interactions, Voices in the Middle, and Journal of College Student Affairs. I also have published book chapters and co-authored two books: Discourse analysis and the study of classroom language and literacy events: A microethnographic perspective and an NCRLL project, On discourse analysis in classrooms: Approaches to language and literacy research and serve on editorial boards. In my “on the ground work,” I have started and facilitate several community-based initiatives: Community Literacy Intervention Program (CLIP), Sistahs Who Care, Social Graces Education Program, Inner Circle, and the IU African American Read-In. I also partner and work with local teachers and principals and an active member of AERA and NCTE.  I am currently serving as chair of the NCTE Research Foundation.

 

Dr. Pimentel joined the Department of English at Texas State University-San Marcos in 2005. He has taught various classes in composition, including first-year composition courses, advanced composition, technical writing, and various critical graduate courses that encompass issues of minority languages and writing. Critically trained in issues of rhetoric/writing and education, Dr. Pimentel combines both of these fields, while addressing critical issues of minoritized individuals in the composition field. Dr. Pimentel’s work has been published in numerous journals and edited books including the Journal of Latinos in Education, Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Community Literacy, Journal of Business and Technical Writing, Teaching Bilingual/Bicultural Children: Teachers Talk About Language and Learning (Eds. Lourdes Diaz Soto and Haroon Kharem), among others.  One of his articles, “Writing New Mexico White: A Critical Analysis of Early Representations of New Mexico in Technical Writing,” (coauthored with Jennifer Ramirez-Johnson, and Charise Pimentel), was nominated for the NCTE award for Best Article Reporting Historical Research or Textual Studies in Technical and Scientific Communication in 2009. Dr. Pimentel was also awarded the Runner-up position for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2008, and the Runner-up position for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Service in 2010 at his home university.

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