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Machine Scoring in the Assessment of Writing - Previous Revision

 

Machine Scoring Fails the Test
New Position Statement on Machine Scoring from NCTE, April 2013

[A] computer could not measure accuracy, reasoning, adequacy of evidence, good sense, ethical stance, convincing argument, meaningful organization, clarity, and veracity in your essay. If this is true I don't believe a computer would be able to measure my full capabilities and grade me fairly. -- Akash, student

[H]ow can the feedback a computer gives match the carefully considered comments a teacher leaves in the margins or at the end of your paper? -- Pinar, student

 (Responses to New York Times The Learning Network blog post, "How Would You Feel about a Computer Grading Your Essays?", 5 April 2013)

"Research on the assessment of student writing consistently shows that high-stakes writing tests alter the normal conditions of writing by denying students the opportunity to think, read, talk with others, address real audiences, develop ideas, and revise their emerging texts over time. Often, the results of such tests can affect the livelihoods of teachers, the fate of schools, or the educational opportunities for students. . . These concerns -- increasingly voiced by parents, teachers, school administrators, students, and members of the general public -- are intensified by the use of machine-scoring systems to read and evaluate students' writing. . . .  (Read the entire position statement.)

 


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