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How Did You Celebrate the National Day on Writing?

students beginning the National Day on WritingEarly in the day, @heoj (Holly Epstein Ojalvo) tweeted, "Hey Twitter, it's the National Day on Writing. Inspire young writers today by tweeting w/ #writetoconnect. You'll be glad you did."

Then NCTE member @brenkrupp (Brenda Krupp) shared a photo of young students "beginning our day of writing."

And so the National Day on Writing celebrations began for many locations across the country, though a number of celebrations were held on Sunday, October 20, the official date of the National Day. This year marks the fifth annual National Day on Writing sponsored by NCTE. Read below about a variety of celebrations held around the country and see related NCTE and ReadWriteThink.org resources.

The National Writing Project and its Educator Innovator Network, along with NCTE, the New York Times Learning Network, and a host of other collaborators, encouraged people to take to Twitter on Monday, October 21, to speak out about how writing helps us connect, using the hashtag #write2connect.

How can Twitter be used in the classroom? Read one teacher's creative approach in the ReadWriteThink.org lesson plan Using Microblogging and Social Networking to Explore Characterization and Style.

NCTE member Katherine Sokolowski invites you to write a blog post about how you use your own writing to connect -- whether it is connecting your own life to your classroom, yourself to your students, or another way entirely. Katherine then asks that you share by visiting her Read, Write, Reflect blog to leave a link in the comments.

Arizona State University had many activities in place for their celebration of the National Day on Writing, including a "digital booth" of videos students had made about writing. Similarly during the 2012 CCCC Annual Convention, numerous Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) members and presenters, including Cynthia Selfe, were interviewed and asked to share their thoughts on writing, past and present.

students writing at computers for National Day on WritingEducator Judy Kozak ?(@kozak_judy) shared an image on Twitter of her students writing in the computer lab. She then blogged about their day.

Paul Naish from Stella and Charles Guttman Community College in New York wrote the following prompts for this year's National Day on Writing celebration. In this activity students are given five minutes to write, with an additional five minutes to send the text message, email, or snail mail.

  • Write to a family member you take for granted and express how much that person helps you.
  • Write to a relative or friend who doesn’t live near you and tell that person you miss him or her.
  • Write to someone who encouraged or inspired you and say thank you. 
  • Write to a public official with a suggestion or a concern.

NCTE member Chelsea Lonsdale ?(@parablematernal) shared an image on Instagram of erasure poetry. The ReadWriteThink.org Word Mover mobile app or online tool can be used for the similar strategy of magnetic poetry.

The Morehead Writing Project joined forces with Morehead State University's Camden-Carroll Library, Center for Leadership and Professional Development, Center for Regional Engagement, and Tutoring and Learning Center to offer Eastern Kentucky educators and students the opportunity to join events marking the fifth annual National Day on Writing. The Morehead celebration kicked off on Sunday, October 20, and will span five days. One of the planned activities is a graffiti wall as described in this ReadWriteThink.org lesson plan.

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How did you celebrate the National Day on Writing? Tell NCTE about your event!

   

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