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College English, Vol. 67, No. 4, March 2005

Cover Art for College English, Vol. 67, No. 4, March 2005

Table of Contents

  • "The Joyous Circle": The Vernacular Presence in Frederick Douglass's Narratives

    Valerie Babb

    Abstract: Tracing the revisions Frederick Douglass made as his Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845) metamorphosed into My Bondage and My Freedom (1855) and ultimately into the Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (1881, 1892), the author suggests that, while much attention has focused on Douglass’s seizing a “forbidden literacy” in transforming himself from object to subject, the crucial, and ever-increasing, role of African American vernacular traditions in his writing should be recognized.

    Keywords: College

  • Blind Skepticism versus a Rhetoric of Assent

    Wayne C. Booth

    Abstract: Booth and Elbow engage in a dialogue about what has become even more important in recent years, namely how we come to believe what we believe and convince others to believe with us. Booth speculates that one needs to commit oneself to combating both dogmatism and skepticism by embracing the rhetoric of assent, and offers rules to help us “learn how to listen”; Elbow agrees with Booth on a number of points but argues for the special value of dissent, perhaps even “unreasonable” dissent, before going on to offer specific classroom practices that can advance their common goal of critical thinking.

    Keywords: College

  • Bringing the Rhetoric of Assent and the Believing Game Together--and Into the Classroom

    Peter Elbow

    Abstract: Booth and Elbow engage in a dialogue about what has become even more important in recent years, namely how we come to believe what we believe and convince others to believe with us. Booth speculates that one needs to commit oneself to combating both dogmatism and skepticism by embracing the rhetoric of assent, and offers rules to help us “learn how to listen”; Elbow agrees with Booth on a number of points but argues for the special value of dissent, perhaps even “unreasonable” dissent, before going on to offer specific classroom practices that can advance their common goal of critical thinking.

    Keywords: College

  • "To Elevate I Must First Soften": Rhetoric, Aesthetic, and the Sublime Traditions

    Melissa Ianetta

    Abstract: Rereading the work of Letitia Elizabeth Landon in light of Hugh Blair’s 1783 Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, the author suggests that current disciplinary definitions of the sublime that separate its aesthetic heritage from its rhetorical foundations suppress those of its aspects that were the particular province of women writers in the nineteenth century, and limit our current understanding.

    Keywords: College

  • REVIEW: Working Out Our History

    Thomas P. Miller and Joseph G. Jones

    Abstract: Reviewed are The Selected Essays of Robert J. Connors,edited by Lisa Ede and Andrea Lunsford; Writing in the Academic Disciplines: A Curricular History, by David R. Russell; Imagining Rhetoric: Composing Women of the Early United States, by Janet Carey Eldred and Peter Mortensen; and Gender and Rhetorical Space in American Life, 1866–1910, by Nan Johnson.

    Keywords: College

  • ANNOUNCEMENTS AND CALLS FOR PAPERS

    Abstract: Abstract for this article is currently not available.

    Keywords: College

* Journal articles are provided in PDF format and can be opened using the free Adobe® Reader® program or a comparable viewer. Click here to download and install the most recent version of Adobe Reader.

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