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Blast from the Past: NCTE Conventions

NCTE Convention Registration  

Did you know how costs have changed over the years? Registration for the 2007 NCTE Annual Convention was $210; in 1915, the first time registration was assessed, it was 25 cents. In 1912 NCTE dues were $2; today they are $40.

Something to think about: Other costs in 1915 were as follows . . .

  • Flour $0.21 (5 lbs.)
  • Butter $0.36 (1 lbs.)
  • Milk $0.18 (1/2 gallon)
  • Shoes $6.00
  • Model T Ford $440

 

Segregation Laws and NCTE Conventions
Did you know that meetings of NCTE were required to conform to state laws? Because of Tennessee regulations, the 1932 NCTE Convention in Memphis was segregated. Meetings for white NCTE members were held in a building on one side of a street, and for black NCTE members on the other side. Major speakers presented twice. The situation did not, however, endure: In 1945 NCTE endorsed a resolution that the Council would hold conventions only in places where there would be no racial or religious discrimination.

Something to think about:  Subsequent Executive Committee motions passed included . . .

  • 1978---to eliminate from consideration as 1982 Convention sites any cities in states which have not ratified the Equal Rights Amendment. 
  • 1981---to not patronage hotels for convention that support or appear to support corporations acting in serious violation of human rights.
  • 1991---to make every effort to consider important social concerns in convention site selection.

Propose a resolution for consideration during the NCTE Annual Convention.

 

Convention Sub-Groups
Did you know that NCTE, even early in its history, sponsored smaller groups, called sections, which met at the conventions? In 1912, two groups convened for meetings: they were the "Normal School Section" and the "Public Speaking Section."

 

Sense of the House Motions at NCTE Conventions
Did you know that sense of the house motions made at NCTE conventions were often serious affairs? While today sense of the house motions are rarely offered on monumental issues, at the 1973 NCTE Convention in Philadelphia it was a different scenario. John Berger of California moved to "support the impeachment of President Nixon and particularly call for Mr. Nixon to account for his misuse of the English language and for his having engaged in certain 'illegal' acts." The motion failed.

 

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